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Items tagged: african american

UC Admissions "Scandal" of 2009!... Yo, let's not freak out... just yet (Part 5 of 6)

The Joint API Legislative Caucus has concerns that the proposed UC eligibility and admissions policy, which has wide ranging ramifications and unknown consequences, has not received the proper public vetting it deserves. The current proposal has only been available for public review for a few months before being presented to the UC Regents for a decision. Outreach regarding the eligibility proposal to the Joint API Legislative Caucus, API civil rights organizations, or API higher education associations has been non-existent. - Letter from Joint API Legislative Caucus to UC Regents, 02.03.09
Hello again, fair readers! Sorry that this post is going up a little later than the last ones have. After the long weekend, I had to go back to school/work.  Today, we're gonna review the last point in the Caucus' letter. I hate to be a stickler and be kinda repetitive, but in the first sentence of the paragraph, I need to correct that the new policy is not regarding admissions. It defines who is Entitled to Review in the UC admissions process. So it's an admissions eligibility policy. But I digress back to earlier posts. And really, what the Caucus is saying hits on a broader issue of how the UC conducts its business (public shared governance? PFFFFT! Whatever!) and how AAPI's engage with the UC... and really how AAPI's aren't very organized in articulating AAPI interests in education policy making overall. Yup! We're gonna critique the UC governance structure, but then take a self-reflexive turn. After all, self-reflexivity and dialogue are the keys to community progress! Corny? Yet so true... so Freirean!

UC Admissions "Scandal" of 2009! ... Yo, let's not freak out... just yet (Part 4 of 6)

The Joint API Legislative Caucus would like to see more detailed projections on what specific API groups would decrease under the new proposal. The Caucus would like to reiterate the importance of disaggregating data on API students at the University of California. It is important to recognize the discrepancies among API ethnic subgroups in their educational attainment and to address the challenges that especially low-income or first-generation API Students face in higher education. - From CA API Legislative Caucus to UC Regents, 02.03.09

Hello... Day 4! More than halfway done. Now that we've reviewed the current policy and the new policy on how students can become entitled to review (ETR) in the UC admissions process, and we've discussed the UC analysts' numbers predicting admit numbers (and how these are mostly irrelevant), we turn to the issue of ethnic disaggregation. Finally, something that I think the Caucus' letter hit on the head... almost.


UC Admissions "Scandal" of 2009! ... Yo, let's not freak out... just yet (Part 3 of 6)

Day 3... if you're still with me, kudos to you!  So, as a review...part 1 was about the current policy and part 2 was about the new policy and predicted racial demographics of students who will be Entitled to Review (ETR) in the UC admissions process. Today, we're going to address this SCARY line in the email sent to community folks by the API Caucus chair. Regarding the policy changes, he states:
These changes negatively affect API applicants and will likely result in lower percentages of API students being admitted to UC campuses.
Alright folks, time to clarify some points in this statement and discuss the difference between ETR (formerly known as "UC eligible") and admissions.

UC Admissions "Scandal" of 2009! ... Yo, let's not freak out... just yet (Part 2 of 6)

The Joint API Legislative Caucus has specific reservatios about how the new admissions proposals would decrease the percentages of Asian Pacific Islanders from 32.6% to 25.2% of the entire eligibility pool, including both guaranteed and entitled to review applicants.  The UC has not made available sufficient information on how or what aspects of the proposal would cause this decrease. -- From California API Legislative Caucus to UC Regents, 02.03.09

Today we're going to have a math lesson on percentages, numerators, and denominators; so we can understand why the percentage of students entitled to UC admissions review (ETR) that are AAPI goes from 32.6% to 25.2%. Before the math lesson, let's understand how the new UC policy will determine which high school students will be entitled to review (ETR) in the UC admissions process.


The Speech — Dual Consciousness on the Presidential Stage

At its core, Tuesday's speech amounted to a groundbreaking big-stage exposition of